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Total/NNPC scholarship 2016/2017 is out

 

Total Upstream Nigeria Limited (TUPNI), in pursuance of its Corporate Social Responsibility, is pleased to announce the commencement of  2016/2017 NNPC/TOTAL National Merit Scholarship application. The scholarship Selection Test conducted on Saturday December 3, 2016, at eleven (11) Centers across the Counry

To qualify for consideration, the applicant MUST:

       •  Be a Registered FULL TIME undergraduate in a recognized Nigerian University

  1. Be a certified 100 or 200 level student at the time of application
  2. Show proof of SSCE or Equivalent Certificate.
  3. Show proof of the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examinations (UTME) score.
  4. Show proof of Admission letter from the University and Matriculation Number
  5. Show proof of A-level or Equivalent Certificate (for direct entry students)

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Students with less than 200 score in UTME need not apply
  • Students with less than 2.50 CGPA of 5-point scale, or equivalent
  • 300 level students and above need not apply
  • Current beneficiaries of similar awards from any other Company or Government Agency do not need to apply
  • https://scholarships.totalcsredu.com
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Posted in Uncategorized

Ten Skills You Need To Develop For The Future(FORBES)

As big disruptive shifts hit the workplace we all get taken out of our comfort zones. Whereas once we felt in control, the stakes are evolving rapidly and our ability to adapt is falling behind.   If we consider the recent gallup poll results that indicates that only a mere 30% of the workforce is actually committed to doing a good job, engaged, it really drives home the point that we may need to take a deeper look at the skills we have today, map them against the various trends that are impacting the workplace, and derive a view to the skills we will need moving forward.

recent report published by the Institute for the Future (IFTF), does an outstanding job of identifying the key work skills and capabilities needed in the next few years (and arguably needed now).  Here they are:

 

Sensemaking

Steve Jobs once said ““Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something”.   Sensemaking is all about the ability to connect things to create new ideas. Quoting Maria Popova, who has really crystallized this notion, in order for us to truly create and contribute to the world, we have to be able to connect countless dots, to cross-pollinate ideas from a wealth of disciplines, to combine and recombine these pieces and build new castles.

Social Intelligence

Relationships and the ability to connect with people becomes and remains a crucial capability, however, as John Hagel thoughtfully points out, influence and relationship-building will now come from asking the right questions, not necessarily having all the answers. In the age of the individual, you can no longer assume that every person shares the same goals, desires and motivators. Whether you are engaging with an employee or a customer, everyone is unique and wants to be catered to in a way that’s unique to them.   The ability to connect with people in a deeper, more meaningful way whether they are colleagues or strangers will enable us to thrive in beyond the industrial age, get things done and solve complex problems. To do so, and despite the abstraction of technology, we must continue to develop capabilities to quickly understand other’s emotions, motivations and triggers and take a human approach to business.

Novel & Adaptive Thinking

As employment growth gets polarized into either ends of low-skill jobs or high-skills jobs, it is important that we always evolve our thinking towards the future to ensure we stay relevant.   At the pace by which companies are changing, staying up-to-date is no longer enough. Taking self-initiative to constantly improve your skills, pushing yourself outside of your comfort zone, becoming a perpetual student, and quickly adapting to new realities will help ensure you are creating value and will keep you out of the cross-hairs for outsourcing.

Cross-Cultural Competencies

The recent Harvard Business Review piece “How to say “This is Crap” in different cultures serves yet another reminder as to how important it is to be able to be effective in different cultural settings.   Globalization is no longer the buzzword in corporate America, it is reality.   Many of us work globally every day, interacting with a multitude of cultures, but those who know how to empathize and adjust their communications and style of collaboration, will always have an advantage when working across geographies and cultures.

Computational Thinking

No, this doesn’t mean you should think like a computer, but nonetheless, being analytical becomes center-stage as data is everywhere.   You get it from all sorts of sources, whether you are sifting through dozens of emails, or crunching huge Excel spreadsheets. The ability to translate vast amounts of into actual insight is now, more than ever a critical skill.   Many of us work with data on a daily basis, but to understand the meaning, the trends and patterns of what the data is telling us becomes paramount.   Are sales tanking? Are people jumping ship? These are things you wouldn’t be able to tell just a single number.

New Media Literacy

Still printing your 50-slide powerpoint decks? The world of videos, blogs, and podcasts has changed the way we communicate and consume information.   With an entire generation that was born digital entering the workforce, everyone will need to become fluent in digital and social media forms of communications in the same way that they currently assess a paper or presentation.

Transdisciplinarity 

In the age of mounting competition and vast technological change, the capabilities needed to successfully differentiate a company and win in the marketplace are much broader than they were in the past.   We can no longer rely on just bringing together groups of specialists to solve our most complex problems. Instead, companies are in need of Generalists (or polymaths if you prefer that word) with new, agile skills that can see the big picture, listen, synthesize ideas and connect the dots.

Design Mindset

We live in a transitional phase between an old “business world” where mass production ruled and products and services were conceived in a lab and then rolled out to the masses and a “new world” where people-centric approaches are increasingly being used to create new products and services that are thoughtfully designed through interdisciplinary teams and collaborative processes. A design mindsetrefers to the ideas and attitudes by which a person approaches a situation.   It is about focusing on human values and developing a deep understanding of the people that matter most to the problem we’re trying to solve. Through practicing empathy, whether through conversation, observation or experiencing, adopting a design mindset becomes a critical ingredient in the ability to execute successfully.

Cognitive Load Management

The shear amount of data and information that hits us in a short span of time has exponentially increased with streams in multiple formats coming from multiple devices.   A tweet here, a text message or email there and pretty soon managing the flow and prioritization of all this information becomes a challenge.   The ability to effectively filter and focus what on what really requires your attention becomes paramount. This includes effectively managing your channels, deciding where to participate vs. where not to and taking a disciplined approach to managing distractions as opposed to real priorities.

Virtual Collaboration

Whether you’re a fan of it or not, working and collaborating effectively virtually, whether on a simple task or a very complex challenge is a necessity as the nature of our work is globalized.   Despite a variety of tools and technologies that are now available, we still struggle with being effective as members or leaders of virtual teams.   Technologically, the future for virtual collaboration looks very promising with enterprise tech taking a page out of successful consumer ventures, but the virtual work also demands a new set of competencies and effort in order to ensure productivity in a cross-cultural, fully global reality.

In a world where staying relevant becomes a top priority (for individuals as well as companies), there are no guarantees that either of these skills will lead to success.   The key becomes taking charge of your own destiny by evaluating where you are today and charting your personal map as to where you want to go.

Posted in Uncategorized

QUESTIONS ON INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY

Questions and Answers

1. 

What type of body plan to sponges have?
A. 

Asymmetrical

B. 

Bilateral

C. 

Radial

2. 

What type of digestive system to sponges have?
A. 

2 way: in through mouth, out through anus

B. 

1 way: in through mouth, out through anus

C. 

2 way: in through mouth, out through mouth

3. 

Sponges lack:
A. 

Bones, specific body plan, and flagella

B. 

Organs, specific body plan, and tissue

C. 

Organs, specific body plan, and teeth

4. 

Sponges reproduce how?
A. 

Sexually and asexually

B. 

Just by budding

C. 

Just sexually

5. 

Sponges exchange gas through?
A. 

Diffusion

B. 

Breathing

C. 

Spicules

6. 

What helps with sponge excretion?
A. 

Collar cells

B. 

Diffusion

C. 

Amoebocytes

7. 

Definition of collar cells:
A. 

Whip like flagella that power the pump

B. 

Pick up food from collar cells

C. 

Help with reproduction

8. 

Spicules help the sponge by:
A. 

Helping to identify the type of sponge, gives it form, makes it rigid

B. 

Helping to identify the collar cells, makes it rigid

C. 

Makes it rigid

9. 

Definition of amoebocytes:
A. 

Pick up food from the collar cells, digest it, give out nutrients to other cells, and transport oxygen

B. 

Transport oxygen

C. 

Gives it form, helps dispose of wastes, distributes nutrients, power the pump, participate in reproduction

10. 

First animals to have sensitive tentacles?
A. 

Cephalopods

B. 

Crustaceans

C. 

Arthropods

D. 

Cnidarians

11. 

Which phylum invented movement?
A. 

Cnidarians

B. 

Gastropods

C. 

Platyhelmenthis

12. 

First group to have a head/brain?
A. 

Bivalves

B. 

Flatworms

C. 

Roundworms

13. 

Cnidarians have what 2 types of body form?
A. 

Medusa body form, polyp

B. 

Medusa body form, asymmetrical

C. 

Radial

14. 

Cnidarians what type of body plan?
A. 

Asymmetrical

B. 

Radial

C. 

Bilateral

15. 

Cnidarians reproduce:
A. 

Sexually and asexually

B. 

Sexually

C. 

Asexually

16. 

Describe nematocytes:
A. 

They are the stinging cells which stuns a prey

B. 

They chill on the beach

C. 

They are the actual tentacle which darts out to sting a prey

17. 

The digestive system of a Cnidarian?
A. 

2 way

B. 

1 way

18. 

Types of Cnidarians:
A. 

Hydra, portugese man-of-war, sea urchin

B. 

Hydra, portugese man-of war, sea anemones, jellyfish

C. 

Jellyfish, sea anemones, octopi, and squids

19. 

Cnidarian brain:
A. 

Similar to the human brain

B. 

Nerve net (cluster of nerves)

20. 

Cnidarians exchange gas through:
A. 

Diffusion

B. 

Water vascular system

C. 

Gills

D. 

Lungs

21. 

What type of body plan to flatworms/roundworms have?
A. 

Asymmetrical

B. 

Radial

C. 

Bilateral

22. 

What are Flatworms?
A. 

Acoelomates

B. 

Pseudocoelomate

C. 

Coelomates

23. 

Flatworms are the first. . .
A. 

Things to have legs

B. 

Things to have eyes

C. 

Mobile hunters

24. 

Digestion of a flatworm:
A. 

2 way

B. 

1 way

25. 

How do flatworms reproduce?
A. 

Sexually

B. 

Asexually

C. 

Both

26. 

Roundworms digest food through what type of digestive system?
A. 

2 way

B. 

1 way

27. 

Examples of a flatworm are?
A. 

Tapeworms, segmented worms

B. 

Tapeworms, flukes

C. 

Hookworm, pinworm

28. 

Examples of a roundworm are?
A. 

Hookworm, pinworm, threadworm

B. 

Tapeworms, flukes, segmented worms

C. 

Scaleworm, leech, featherduster worm

29. 

Overall body structure of both roundworms and flatworms?
A. 

5 part body plan

B. 

Segmented bodies

C. 

3 tissue layers

30. 

What is a roundworm?
A. 

Acoelomate

B. 

Pseudocoelomate

C. 

Coelomate

31. 

Reproduction of roundworms?
A. 

Sexually

B. 

Asexually

C. 

Both

32. 

Gas exchange for roundworms?
A. 

Diffusion

B. 

Lungs

C. 

Gills

33. 

Examples of annelids?
A. 

Scale worm, leech, featherduster, spagetti worm

B. 

Scale worm, leach, featherduster, acoelomate

34. 

Annelid body plan?
A. 

Asymmetrical

B. 

Radial

C. 

Bilateral

35. 

What are annelids?
A. 

Acoelomates

B. 

Pseudocoelomates

C. 

Coelomates

36. 

First group to have a closed circulatory system?
A. 

Flatworms

B. 

Roundworms

C. 

Annelids

D. 

Arthropods

37. 

Annelid Reproduction:
A. 

Sexually

B. 

Asexually

C. 

Both

D. 

Sexual and hermaphroditic

38. 

What type of digestion does an annelid have?
A. 

2 way

B. 

1 way

39. 

Excretion of annelids:
A. 

In through the mouth and out through the anus

B. 

In and out through the mouth

40. 

Gas exchange for Annelids?
A. 

Diffusion

B. 

Breathing

C. 

Gills

41. 

Examples of bivalves:
A. 

Scallops, clams, muscle, oysters

B. 

Octopi, squid

C. 

Snail, slugs

42. 

5 main parts of a bivalve:
A. 

Head, foot, stomach, anus

B. 

Gills, mouth, foot, anchoring, coelom

C. 

Mantle, foot, vascular cavity, foot, coelom

43. 

Definition of a mantle:
A. 

Helps with respiration, waste disposal, digging, anchoring

B. 

Helps with respiration, waste disposal, sensory reception, and houses organs

44. 

Digestion for bivalves:
A. 

2 way (filter feeders)

B. 

1 way (filter feeders)

45. 

gas exchange for bivalves:
A. 

Gills

B. 

Mouth

C. 

Lungs

46. 

type of reproduction (both male and female structures are present in the same individual)
A. 

Sexually

B. 

Asexually

C. 

Both

47. 

Examples of gastropods:
A. 

Snails, slugs, leafy horn mouth, leek

B. 

Snails, slugs, leafy horn mouth, moon snail

48. 

4 main body parts of a gastropod:
A. 

Foot, stomach, radula, eyes

B. 

Head, eyes, ears, mouth

C. 

Head, foot, mantle, radula

49. 

Gastropods have an open circulatory system?
A. 

True

B. 

False

50. 

Gastropods have a 2 way digestive system.
A. 

True

B. 

False

51. 

Gastropod reproduction:
A. 

Sexually

B. 

Asexually

C. 

Both

52. 

Definition of a radula:
A. 

Mouth used to suck in food

B. 

Tongue used to eat prey

53. 

Snails/Slugs are bilateral
A. 

True

B. 

False

54. 

Cephalopods reproduction:
A. 

Sexually

B. 

Asexually

C. 

Both

55. 

Characteristics of an octopus:
A. 

Lives on the bottom of the ocean

B. 

Hunts when its light outside

C. 

Change colors

D. 

Has 8 tentacles

56. 

digestion for a cephalopod:
A. 

2 way

B. 

1 way

57. 

Cephalopods reproduce both sexually and asexually.
A. 

True

B. 

False

58. 

gas exchange for cephalopods:
A. 

Gills

B. 

Breathing

C. 

Mouth

59. 

Description of a nautilus:
A. 

Lives only on the ocean floor

B. 

Uses natural law forces to move

C. 

Stores sea water inside its shell

D. 

It has a vertically clamping mouth with a radula

Posted in EDUCATION, Science

The best science images of the year.

Are these really the best images of the year?

Raynaud's disease - from Matthew Clavey, Thermal Vision Research
Image captionRaynaud’s disease – Matthew Clavey, Thermal Vision Research

From multicoloured scans of parts of the human body to vivid photos of creatures up close, the finalists of the annual Wellcome Image Awards have been announced.

The thermal image above shows the temperature of two people’s hands – a healthy person on the left, and someone with Raynaud’s disease on the right.

Both hands were put in cold water for two minutes before being imaged. The healthy hand then warmed at a considerably faster rate.

“This image is striking because it shows so vividly the difference between normal circulation and the poor circulation of someone with Raynaud’s disease – triggered by cold temperature, stress and anxiety,” says head of Wellcome Images and chair of the judging panel, Catherine Draycott.

Scroll down to see the other 19 finalists.

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Wiring the human brain

Alfred Anwander, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

Wiring the human brain - Alfred Anwander, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences

A kaleidoscope of colour reveals a map of pathways inside the brain of a young healthy adult.

Different parts of the brain communicate with each other through nerve fibres – which are colour-coded here.

Using a type of magnetic resonance imaging – or MRI – the image was created from mapping virtual slices of the brain, from top to bottom, tracking the direction and movement of water molecules.

“We felt it captured the essence of the technique whilst giving a picture of the living brain,” says Catherine Draycott.

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Black henna allergy

Nicola Kelley, Cardiff and Vale University Hospital NHS Trust

Black henna allergy - Nicola Kelley, Cardiff and Vale University Hospital NHS Trust

“Here you can see a black henna tattoo on the forearm of a young woman who has suffered an allergic reaction to the dye,” explains Dirk Pilat, medical director for e-Learning at the Royal College of GPs, and a GP himself.

“It’s beautifully lit and shows the translucence of the skin that’s been raised in blisters, capturing the early stage of the reaction.”

Dye from the henna plant is commonly used to temporarily stain skin or hair orange-brown, but chemical dyes can be added to turn the colour black.

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Human stem cell

Sílvia A Ferreira, Cristina Lopo and Eileen Gentleman, King’s College London

Human stem cell - Sílvia A Ferreira, Cristina Lopo and Eileen Gentleman, King's College London

“This is a scanning electron micrograph of a stem cell taken from the bone marrow inside the hip bone of a healthy person,” explains Robin Lovell-Badge, a Wellcome awards judge and head of stem cell biology and developmental genetics at the Francis Crick Institute.

“This really stood out, we found the natural symmetry alongside the very subtle colouring very striking. It’s lovely and sharp.”

Stem cells can divide to make some of the other types of cells found in the body.

This one is about 15 micrometres (0.015mm) across – and before the image could be taken, it was first frozen at cryogenic temperatures (lower than −150C or −238F).

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Dividing stem cell in the brain

Paula Alexandre, University College London

Dividing stem cell in the brain - Paula Alexandre, University College London

This swirling pattern shows different stages of a stem cell splitting in two inside the brain of a zebrafish before it hatches.

The circle is about 250 micrometres (0.25mm) wide, and covers a time period of nine hours.

Starting at about the eight o’clock position, the cell splits to make two different cells found in the brain.

“It helps us visualise embryonic development by showing nature’s beautifully orchestrated process of stem cell division – producing a new (purple) stem cell and a differentiated (white) nerve cell,” says Anne Deconinck, executive director of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, in the US.

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Ebola virus

David S Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank

Ebola virus - David S Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank

On 15 March 2016 this image was named as the overall winner of the Wellcome Image Awards.

“This illustration shows the internal structure of an Ebola virus particle, with the central core in three dimensions so you can see the internal structures more clearly,” says visual artist Rob Kesseler, professor at Central Saint Martins at the University of the Arts London.

The Ebola virus is about 100 nanometres (0.0001mm) wide – 200 times smaller than many of the cells that it infects.

“The illustrator chooses pastel colours rather than tonal contrast to show the different elements of this tiny, often lethal virus.

“It shows how illustration can uniquely show many different levels of detail simultaneously, with great beauty and clarity.”

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Infectious disease containment unit

David Bishop, Royal Free Hospital, London

Infectious disease containment unit - David Bishop, Royal Free Hospital, London

“This photograph provides a rare glimpse inside the UKs only high-level isolation unit, taken the day before a nurse was admitted after contracting Ebola,” says judge Rob Kesseler.

“It perfectly captures the calm before the storm, ghostly empty shapes of protective clothing hang, waiting for the patient to be rushed in.”

This special see-through tent surrounds a bed in the Royal Free Hospital in London. All air leaving the unit is cleaned, so the patient can be safely treated without putting other patients or staff at risk.

Nurse Will Pooley made a full recovery.

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Swallowtail butterfly

Daniel Saftner, Macroscopic Solutions

Swallowtail butterfly - Daniel Saftner, Macroscopic Solutions

“It was chosen because it shows so clearly what the mouthparts and the eyes of a swallowtail butterfly look like in really striking detail,” says judge Eric Hilaire, science, environment and global development online picture editor at the Guardian.

Butterflies have two big round eyes for seeing quick movements and two antennae for smelling.

They also have a long feeding tube, which is curled up like a spring here, but it unrolls so the butterfly can use it like a straw to drink nectar from flowers.

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Moth scales

Mark R Smith, Macroscopic Solutions

Moth scales - Mark R Smith, Macroscopic Solutions

“The colour here is actually an optical illusion,” explains judge Eric Hilaire.

“The scales themselves don’t contain much pigment, it’s the way light bounces off the curves which gives them their apparent colour.”

The scales belong to a Madagascan sunset moth – which sparkles with colour in the light and is often mistaken for a butterfly.

This picture is 750 micrometres (0.75mm) wide.

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Inside the human eye

Peter Maloca, University of Basel

Inside the human eye - Peter Maloca, University of Basel

“Here we’re looking inside blood vessels at the back of the human eye, which also supply the retina,” says judge Robin Lovell-Badge of this 3D picture.

“The blood itself is moving too fast to be visible creating this maze of tunnels that looks like a subterranean landscape. It draws your eye towards what appears to be a light at the end.”

Pictures like this are used by doctors to help spot early signs of eye disease. These tiny tunnels are about 100 micrometres (0.1mm) tall.

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Blood vessels in the eye

Kim Baxter, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Blood vessels in the eye - Kim Baxter, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

“What’s fascinating about this is that, when you see it, you don’t automatically think of the eye,” says judge Rob Kesseler. “It appears like an aerial view of a city at night or a telescopic image of a distant galaxy.”

The image was created by photographing the blood vessels in the retina – seen here as white spidery lines – as fluorescent dye was passed through.

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Detecting stroke

Nicholas Evans, University of Cambridge

Detecting stroke - Nicholas Evans, University of Cambridge

“This demonstrates beautifully one of the deadliest two centimetres of pathology in human medicine and is an excellent tool to explain the causation of cerebrovascular accidents, or strokes, to patients,” explains Dirk Pilat.

This medical scan shows, in green, a blocked blood vessel inside the neck of a person.

This vessel carries blood to the brain and when it gets blocked, parts of the brain can get damaged and stop working properly.

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Cow heart

Michael Frank, Royal Veterinary College

Cow heart - Michael Frank, Royal Veterinary College

“This image is striking in its three dimensional sculptural appearance, especially when you know that the heart itself is actually a specimen in a jar,” says Catherine Draycott.

“Beautifully lit and photographed to bring to life an old historical specimen – highlighting both the external surface and internal structures.”

Windows have been cut into this cow’s heart to show what is inside. It is about four times the size of a human heart.

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Engineering human liver tissue

Chelsea Fortin, Kelly Stevens and Sangeeta Bhatia, Koch Institute, MIT

Engineering human liver tissue - Chelsea Fortin, Kelly Stevens and Sangeeta Bhatia, Koch Institute, MIT

This small piece of human liver has been put into a mouse with a damaged liver. The human liver has started to grow, with help from the mouse’s blood.

“It is tissue engineering in action,” says Anne Deconinck from the Koch Institute.

“In response to tissue damage, cells can reorganise and heal, and even develop much-needed blood vessels.

“This image with the heart-shaped patch of engineered liver cells beautifully conveys a message of hope – and the promise of scientific advancements to overcome the challenges of replacement organ shortages and disease, including cirrhosis and liver cancer.”

This image appears as a result of the partnership between Wellcome Images and the Koch Institute at MIT, Cambridge, USA.

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Bacteria on graphene oxide

Izzat Suffian, Kuo-Ching Mei, Houmam Kafa and Khuloud T Al-Jamal, King’s College London

Bacteria on graphene oxide - Izzat Suffian, Kuo-Ching Mei, Houmam Kafa and Khuloud T Al-Jamal, King's College London

“This image serves really well to illustrate the fact that graphene, a recently discovered material, is just one atom thick,” says Catherine Draycott.

“The details of the creases in the graphene contrast with the enormous torpedo shaped bacteria, which we know to be very small organisms.”

Graphene – seen here in purple – is an extremely thin sheet of carbon, and is one of the thinnest, strongest materials so far discovered.

Researchers are trying to stick different medicines to it so they can be carried to the right place in the body when needed. The bacteria are about two micrometres (0.002mm) long.

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Premature baby receiving light therapy

David Bishop, Royal Free Hospital, London

Premature baby receiving light therapy - David Bishop, Royal Free Hospital, London

On 15 March 2016, at the Wellcome Image Awards, this image was named as the winner of the Julie Dorrington Award for outstanding photography in a clinical environment.

This baby was born early and has jaundice, a common condition which turns the skin and eyes yellow.

The baby is being treated in an incubator at Barnet Hospital in north London, and lies under a blue coloured light, with eyes covered.

“One of the reasons this was picked is that it is intimate yet respectful – due to the framing and angle of the photograph,” says Catherine Draycott.

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Clathrin cage

Maria Voigt, RCSB Protein Data Bank

Clathrin cage - Maria Voigt, RCSB Protein Data Bank

“Clathrin is a protein found in cells, and here molecules of it have come together to form this cage like structure which helps move things around the cell,” explains judge Eric Hilaire.

“The illustration and its shading bring out the three dimensional nature of this structure.”

Cells can have lots of these tiny cages inside them. This cage measures about 50 nanometres (0.00005mm) across.

When the cage is not being used it breaks up into smaller pieces, which get recycled. The cage can be put back together again when it’s next needed.

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Toxoplasmosis-causing parasites

Leandro Lemgruber, University of Glasgow

Toxoplasmosis-causing parasites - Leandro Lemgruber, University of Glasgow

“It looks quite blurry because of the extreme magnification of this tiny parasite which causes toxoplasmosis,” says judge Robin Lovell-Badge.

“This infinitesimally small organism, found in infected cat faeces and raw or undercooked meat, is particularly dangerous to pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems.”

Here, DNA inside each parasite (blue/green) is surrounded by membrane (red) and protein (black).

This image was created using a type of super-resolution microscopy. Each parasite measures 10 micrometres (0.01mm) long.

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Bone development

Frank Acquaah

Bone development - Frank Acquaah

“Here modern technology is used on historical remains,” says Catherine Draycott. “The images are made with micro-computed tomography – penetrating wave scans – which show how the internal structure of the bone evolves as a baby develops in the womb and after birth.”

Each circle shows bone from an infant at a different age. The youngest (three months before birth) is on the left and the oldest (2.5 years old) is on the right. These historical bones all come from the skeletons of children who died in the 19th Century.

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White line 2 pixels

Maize leaves

Fernan Federici, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile and University of Cambridge

Maize leaves - Fernan Federici, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile and University of Cambridge

“This image evokes the work of Gustav Klimt with its beautiful, gilded mosaic look,” says Anne Deconinck from the Koch Institute.

This is a confocal micrograph looking inside a cluster of leaves from a young maize (corn) plant.

Each curled leaf is made up of lots of small cells (small green square and rectangle shapes) – and inside each cell is a nucleus (orange circle), the part of the cell which stores genetic information.

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BBC Astronomy contest winners — Why Evolution Is True

The BBC has announced the winners of its Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest, and although I’m not showing the prize-winning image (it doesn’t move me), here are a few I especially liked. Go over and see the others. The BBC’s captions are indented: The runner-up in this section was also a composite image. Taken […]

via BBC Astronomy contest winners — Why Evolution Is True